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The New Yorker 全篇(2019)

Around dinnertime, the line of young, well-heeled diners that predictably slithers out of Szechuan Mountain House is long and unrelenting enough that regulars have mastered a routine: wordlessly retrieve a number from the headset-wearing maître d’, ascertain the estimated wait time (usually between thirty and ninety minutes), and limber up the palate at one of the three bubble-tea places on the block that serve as informal anterooms to the spiciest kitchen on St. Mark’s Place.

​Eater 全篇(2017)

Last year, reports began circulating of an attractive and expensive new restaurant in Flushing with the evocative name of Szechuan Mountain House. So, in early January of this year, a group of spice-loving friends and I set out for the restaurant. It was located in a fancy shopping center on Prince Street north of Roosevelt Avenue, just off a cobbled interior courtyard that wasn’t the easiest thing in the world to find. Our wait on a weeknight was nearly two hours.

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Eater 推荐餐厅(2021)

Yes, New Year’s Eve was different with large parties off the table, indoor dining verboten and an outdoor curfew of 10 p.m. But that doesn’t mean welcoming in 2021 and toasting to its arrival has to be quiet. With temperatures predicted to climb to the mid 40s, and little else going on, taking advantage of outdoor dining is an option for every meal for the first day of the new year. Whether you want to launch the year with a brunch of omelets, devour pizza in the late afternoon, or settle in to an evening seafood feast, there is a restaurant with an inviting heated enclosure ready to welcome you. Below are some options to kick off the new year.

Eater ​头条(2017)

Flushing Sichuan restaurant Szechuan Mountain House has opened its East Village location at 23 Saint Mark’s Place, complete with a koi pond and cast-iron tea post. Bedford and Bowery reports that the restaurant is aiming high — owners want the location to win a Michelin star at some point. Dishes like sliced pork belly with chili garlic sauce, Chinese yam, and fish fillet stew with pickled cabbage and chili are on the menu. A grand opening will come later this month.

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​Eater 推荐菜(羊肉系列)2021

Yes, New Year’s Eve was different with large parties off the table, indoor dining verboten and an outdoor curfew of 10 p.m. But that doesn’t mean welcoming in 2021 and toasting to its arrival has to be quiet. With temperatures predicted to climb to the mid 40s, and little else going on, taking advantage of outdoor dining is an option for every meal for the first day of the new year. Whether you want to launch the year with a brunch of omelets, devour pizza in the late afternoon, or settle in to an evening seafood feast, there is a restaurant with an inviting heated enclosure ready to welcome you. Below are some options to kick off the new year.

​Grubhub 纽约川菜推荐(2017)

New Yorkers who love Sichuan food are incredibly lucky: There’s an almost shocking number of places in this city where you can get really, really good mala cooking, from the Bowery to Bensonhurst to Bayside. Whether you’re looking to get your fix of dan-dan noodles, double-cooked pork belly, fiery Chongqing chicken, and other go-to classics, or discover a new favorite, here are the absolute best Sichuan restaurants in New York.

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